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How To Make Money Work In A Marriage

‘Avoid Financial Infidelity,’ Money-Minded Psychologist Says

Children, sex, in-laws, work stress – how couples handle these issues says plenty about a marriage and, often, a divorce. Not surprising to many, however, the No. 1 predictor of divorce is money, according to a study from Kansas State University.

More specifically, researchers say that arguing about money, especially early in a relationship, is the best predictor of divorce – despite a couple’s economic bracket.

“As with sex, for example, arguments about money are probably connected to deeper, underlying issues, such as trust, self-esteem, identity, etc.,” says Dr. Anne Brennan Malec, a clinical psychologist and marriage and family therapist with a background in accounting and business.

“Like most other areas of conflict, frequent communication and formulating a plan for how to address the financial situation allows many, if not most, issues to be adequately and respectfully resolved.”

Dr. Malec, author of the book “Marriage in Modern Life: Why It Works, When It Works” (www.drannemalec.com), offers constructive solutions for marital money stressors.

•  Be partners in your common cause. When one partner carries most of the financial burden, it can thrust that partner into an almost parental role over the other. This is a form of asymmetry that can affect other areas of the relationship and erode a marriage, creating resentment by each partner for different reasons. Whether or not you make roughly the same amount of money as your spouse – or none at all because you’re a stay-at-home parent – stay involved in the goings on of your household’s finances. Understand what you can and cannot afford as a family. Communication is crucial. Discuss your feelings about money and how both of you contribute to the overall well-being of your family.

•  Avoid financial infidelity.Every couple has to determine how their joint and individual expenses will be shared. Account for the necessities, from rent or mortgage to groceries and more. Account for all of your typical expenses, which may include date night and individual interests or hobbies. Respect individual interests – whether or not they are reasonable expenses, understand that they are important to your partner and may help the relationship. If one shops too much or spends too much on cars, find a way to compromise. Having an agreed-upon monthly budget helps minimize financial tension, and to spend more requires a good explanation.

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Here you can get the buzz on tactics and tips to successfully manage your money and avoid credit problems.These booklets cover the basics of creating and using a budget, how women can manage their personal finances, how to cope with financial stress, teaching your children about money, preventing identity theft, how to avoid common money mistakes, the basics of credit cards and much more! Click on the booklet cover to launch these free PDF files. Learn how to successfully manage money and avoid credit problems. This guide was created with two purposes in mind; first, to help people create and use a successful budget; second, to provide proven strategies for avoiding excess debt. This basic ‘Credit 101’ publication explores the pros and cons of using credit, provides a guide and calculation formula to help consumers find out how much credit they can afford, and offers advice on what elements should be considered before applying for a credit card, how to build a positive credit history, and existing credit rights. When it comes to women and money, the news can be gloomy. We live longer; we earn less, and are less secure in retirement. But the news isn’t all bad, because women can also be terrific budgeters, investors, savers and entrepreneurs. Everyone makes mistakes with their money. It happens, but it can lead to problems, and these problems may escalate if you don’t do the right things to correct them. This guide is to help you solve the money mistakes that could occur during your lifetime. The world of finances can be tricky and if you don’t act to correct these mistakes you could be putting your financial future at risk.
If you’re like most people, you probably learned about money from the “School of Hard Knocks.” If you were lucky, you may have had parents who talked openly about money with you, and perhaps even showed you how to earn and save money. This guide helps parents talk to their children about smart money management and the value of money. This publication discusses the fastest growing federal crime in the country and provides steps one can take to minimize the chances of personal information being stolen and used by a thief. The first part of this brochure is organized into checklists you can use to put these ideas into practice. The second part of this brochure will give you steps to take if you are a victim. This booklet will give you an overview of the basics of getting a mortgage, buying a home, and building equity. If you’re under financial stress, you may be arguing with your spouse or family members about money, experiencing headaches or panic attacks, hiding bills or receipts from family members, or finding it difficult to sleep at night. Your eating habits may have gone south, and you may find it hard to make it through the day. Use this guide to help you deal with your stress.